Sublime to the ridiculous

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Content warning: If you are close to convincing your better-half that camping is a really great idea, disavow all knowledge of this post.

Hello! I’ve been thwarted in my attempts to post in the last three weeks due to not having enough ‘fibre’ across the top end of Australia. I still don’t fully understand because W hasn’t drawn me a picture, but apparently having coverage and having speed to upload stuff is different. Stabbing my finger repeatedly on the return key doesn’t help either.  W makes a dial whizz around on his iPad and declares the location blog-possible or not.  As we have made it to the East Coast, the dial should whizz above 0.84 megabits and I can get back to where I left off…

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And the Landscape Design Award goes to…nature

Monitor Lizard, critter time (for Kenny)

Monitor Lizard, critter time (for Kenny)

When we packed up at Cape Range, a little surprise awaited me on the underside of the groundsheet; two poor little mice in pancake form, a vision now burned into my retina for the rest of all time. I had managed to forget the stowaway Huntsman spider, the ticks, and the poor man dismantling his two month old Toyota to evict the family of rats that were eating his vehicle from the inside of the seats out. Until then.

Mt Nameless Rd, looks innocuous enough

Mt Nameless Rd, the 4WD alternative to Tom Price. Looks innocuous enough.

We headed in the direction of Tom Price, and at 4pm set up camp on the side of the highway, close enough to deter psychopaths, far enough from the road-train that would inevitably park nearby, and run their refrigeration units all night. Opening the back door of the car to pull out bits of tent, a tiny stowaway mouse freaked out and shot into the depths of our vehicle. A forensic sweep of the Silverado coaxed it out of the car and straight under the imagined sanctity of our tent. By morning, two of them made it out alive to examine their new digs in the local spinifex.

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The last time I was at Tom Price, Stevie, Suz, W and I went to the only restaurant open at 6.30pm – the hotel – where no menu item escaped the scorching love of the deep fryer. Jump aboard the DeLorean and fast forward 5 years, and we found ourselves at Crave coffee cart that not only served a great heart starter, but oh my! smoothies with kale. I caught up with the lovely Matt and Kass, mid-roadtrip to meet photographers for new venture Austockphoto, started by Kass and business partner Clare. Hallelujah for beautiful Australian stock imagery, and hooray for tangibly supporting Australian artists! The Coles was another revelation. Jammed with every kind of produce you could want, we set new records in Paleo contraband (six kinds of kinds of cheese anyone?), and set off for Dales Gorge camp at Karijini National Park.

I waited for the nude swimmer to leave, Circular Pool, Karijini

I waited for the nude swimmer to leave, Circular Pool, Karijini

The numerous campsites at Dales Gorge were spacious and shady, the serenity broken only by the grind of the Parks generator, and the five flirty European 20-somethings next door, travelling in a tardis. I still can’t figure out where they all slept.

Hancock Gorge where you wished you had worn more grippy shoes

Hancock Gorge where you wished you had worn more grippy shoes

Karijini has numerous stunning walks, some a short wander, some a sweaty ridge top walk, and a couple of sweaty-palmed spider climbs, like Hancock Gorge, rewarded by a cool gorge pool. Everyone seemed to have the same idea. It was a race against time. We all wanted to do an Edmund Hillary and knock all of the bastards off, and the same faces showed up at every walk throughout the day. Most striking were the family groups, with home-school books pressed to the back window of their packed vehicles. A typical bunch had five adults with at least seven kids aged two to ten. A beaming three year old boy matched us walk for walk and stayed considerably more cheerful than I did battling heat and mosquitoes.  The older kids raced each other up every rocky ledge and tricky incline with the agility of rock wallabies, while their mother told me they didn’t really bother with the home school stuff, they had adventures instead.

A walking bottle of bug deterrent. Karijini National Park.

A walking bottle of bug deterrent. Karijini National Park.

That night we took in an Astro-tour at the campground, run by Phil Witt, a sound and light spectacular. I thought the Milky Way was a cloudy blob, but no! Densely populated with up to 400 billion stars, I gained a new appreciation for how extra teeny Earth is, and how any number uttered with more than nine zeros recalls the horrors of Pure Maths and Stats at Canterbury University, before converting to white noise in my ears.

Millstream Chichester National Park, homestead walk.

Millstream Chichester National Park, homestead walk.

I had read about Millstream Chichester a few years back, and never got there. Lush with wetlands thanks to an underground aquifer estimated to contain 1700 million cubic metres of water, the surrounding country supports a wide variety of species. It was worth tackling 200km of corrugated 4WD thick with bull-dust.    Arriving at any campsite at dusk usually means you get the sole remaining camp site, next to the rubbish bins, and out in the burning sun. Which is exactly what happened. It was a breathless 39 degrees on the last campsite, as we paused to draw smiley faces in the red veneer of dust on everything outside the vehicle. I said to W that it’s ok, AT LEAST there were showers. Opening door after door to over-ripe bush-loos, I was confronted with the irrefutable fact I need reading glasses.

So dirty right now. Cant believe the layer of dirt on my clothes doesn't show up!

So dirty right now. That is not a tan.

The aquifer, along with the Harding Dam supplies water to ‘industry’ and residents in Dampier, Karratha and other surrounding towns. Unceasingly through the night, the inescapable drone of an industrial water pumping station sliced through the silence, but the brochure reassured me that this is to just to keep the Park wetlands topped up and ensure the survival of dependent species. Hmmm.  Awake since 3am, waiting for first light, we thundered out in a cloud of red dust headed for Point Samson, an idyllic seaside spot for a shower, power, laundry facilities, and the promise of the ‘Best Beach in the world’ at Hearson Cove.

Best Beach In The World they said. Hearson Cove, Dampier Peninsula.

Best Beach In The World. Perhaps on another day? Hearson Cove, Burrup Peninsula.

There are many things to do in the West Pilbara Coast, ideally in the early dry season, and ideally if you have access to a boat. Having failed in our search for snorkelling and swimming, almost being carried off by midges and devoid of waterborne vessel, we headed out to the Burrup Peninsula in search of one of Australia’s most prolific Aboriginal rock art sites, with over 10,000 engravings and etchings, dating back 30,000 years. Their location is somewhat mysterious. Three hours and five failed attempts down nondescript trails later, I can confirm they are 2.2km from the turnoff to Hearson Cove from the Burrup Peninsula Road, down a gravel track.  Despite the noonday sun leaching all colour from both the landscape and my life-force, the rock art looked freshly pressed.

10,000 etchings and drawings dating back 30,000 years Burrup Peninsula

10,000 etchings and drawings dating back 30,000 years, yet so fresh!

Our next stop was Barn Hill Station, champion of corrugated iron architecture and the authentic bush experience (covered in this post).  We went from Barn Hill to far fancier digs at the Cable Beach Resort in Broome, where the rooms are lined in corrugated iron.

NEXT: Broome, Cape Leveque and Derby

Lambstails, Road to Tom Price

Lambstails, Road to Tom Price


6 Comments on “Sublime to the ridiculous”

  1. Hily billy says:

    I always laugh out loud reading these posts. Rock etching has gone straight to iPad wallpaper.

  2. Daz says:

    I can’t believe it took W 3 hours and 5 failed attempts.
    Normally, it is 2 to 3 attempts, then the map is all wrong, then give up, and start a fire to play with something, before cooking a camp oven and sending photos of a magnificent meal to everybody.
    Surely, N must have got involved and introduced that old NZ culture, we are not stopping until we get to the top of Everest.

  3. Tracey says:

    Brilliant!! How is the vino going? Have you had to restock the mobile wine cellar yet?


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